Book Review: Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill

9780064400992Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill

Maud Hart Lovelace

Harper Trophy

171 pages

Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book in Maud Hart Lovelace’s Betsy-Tacy series.  In this book, Betsy, Tacy and Tib turn ten but continue to display the charming childish ideologies they displayed in books one and two.  As mischevious as ever, this time they’re exploring new areas, specifically a Syrian settlement referred to as Little Syria, where they meet a girl their age named Naifi.  Naifi has just come to the US and is trying to integrate herself in the way of American customs as well as learning English.  The girls take an immediate liking to her and attempt to help her fit in.

Meanwhile, Betsy, Tacy and Tib are up to their same old hijinks, where they employ their outlandish imaginations.  Most of the book centers around their preparation for a show they’re putting on at school as well as the crowning of Tib as a queen, an honor bestowed upon her because she has a white pleated dress.  As always, the stories are based on Maud Hart Lovelace’s childhood and her friend Midge, on whom Tib is based, actually had a white MarjorieGerlachPC-webpleated dress herself.

Out of the three Betsy-Tacy books I’ve read, this one stands out as my favorite so far.  It was much more fluid–most of the stories were continuations of one another, so there was very little disparity.  I am looking forward to reading the fourth book in the series because it is the last one meant for a grade school level.  Books five and up are for an audience is a bit older, so those will probably be more engaging for me.

I read this book as a part of the Maud Hart Lovelace Reading Challenge over at a Library is a Hospital for the Mind.

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For other reviews of Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, check out the following blogs.

Booking Mama

I’m Booking It

A Library is a Hospital for the Mind

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2 Responses

  1. […] Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, by Maud Hart Lovelace […]

  2. The more of these you review the more I am thinking about going out and picking up a copy! You’re such a bad influence! 🙂

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